EARLY SPRING GARDENING: WHAT TO PLANT AND WHEN

 
Despite lingering winter weather conditions and temperatures, it’s still possible and important to get started early on planting your spring vegetables.

When is the right time to plant, and which vegetables should be planted? What should be done to prepare the soil? Here are some helpful early gardening tips that will answer those questions and more.

PREPARING THE SOIL

The best soil prep is done in the fall by mixing compost (Oakdell Organic Compost) into the soil. The basic green thumb rule is two inches of organic matter worked into six inches of soil. With the right amount of organic matter in the soil, it’s easier for a plant to get air, water and nutrients to the roots.

More organic matter mixed into less soil can be counterproductive and limit plant growth. If you have heavy, wet clay, lacking air space, your plants won’t do well.

Even if you are starting in the spring, it’s still a good idea to till the soil and mix in organic matter and fertilizer to provide the optimum seed bed. Make sure it’s truly composted organic material to create a healthy and ready to grow root zone. Green matter that has not yet been composted (grass clippings, bark, etc.) is better collected in the summer and blended into the soil in the fall. Use a compost bin to collect organic materials throughout the year.

WHAT TO PLANT AND WHEN

When it comes to planting, vegetables can be divided into two groups.

The first group, the “cole crops,” are cool season vegetables. They are comprised of vegetables started directly in your garden and indoors.

This first group of vegetables can be planted around Valentine’s Day, once the snow has melted (don’t plant in the snow). You may plant these seeds outside directly into your garden: kohlrabi, kale, collards, Chinese kale, peas, onions, radishes, spinach, lettuce and turnips.

Cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower and brussel sprouts are best started indoors as early as 4-6 weeks before planting them outside. Peppers usually start 8-10 weeks before they are ready to go outside. A greenhouse or hot box would be an ideal indoor setting so these plants can start to grow.

The second group should be planted in your garden from seed 2-3 weeks later, one or two weeks into March. This list includes beets, carrots, potatoes, swiss chard and parsnips.

FROST AND SNOW CONCERNS

These two vegetable groups perform and produce better in cool to warm weather. They become stressed in the hot days and nights of summer. The same can be planted again in the late summer/early fall when they can benefit from light frosts of early fall.

With that said, snow and frost are still a concern. Most garden plants don’t tolerate colder temperatures. Sometimes it’s necessary to cover your plants early in the season with Wall of Water, Hot Caps, Insulate blankets or similar products to protect them from the cold. The last frost along the Wasatch Front is usually somewhere close to Mother’s Day.

ADDITIONAL INSIGHTS

Managers at IFA Country Stores suggest growing the plants you like to eat while trying something new now and then. Don’t forget to try planting a fall crop this year.

To maintain healthy plants, consider using IFA’s Grand Champion All Purpose Fertilizer or 16-16-8 Garden Blend an average of 1 or 2 times about six weeks apart.

For more information, download this Utah State University Extension “Vegetable Planting Guide,” which offers more details about vegetables to plant and when to plant them.

 


Information for this article was provided by Nick Loveland, Certified Arborist, Assistant Manager, Ogden IFA Country Store; Daniel Thatcher, Branch Manager, Price IFA Country Store; Jill Fillingim, Price IFA Country Store; and Kent Mickelsen, Utah Certified Nurseryman, IFA Country Store.

DOWNLOAD ARTICLE (PDF) DOWNLOAD PLANTING GUIDE (PDF)

 
 


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